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Heat exhaustion, lasting effects, continue performance?

 
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The Toninator NLI
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 04, 2004 9:59 am GMT +0000    Post subject: Heat exhaustion, lasting effects, continue performance? Reply with quote

During the 12 hour guts and glory race I felt I had hit the wall, a total bonk, on my 3rd lap directly in the heat of the day. Tunnel vision, dizziness, nausea, weakness and hot skin (although I did accidentally rub off my suntan lotion before this lap.) After the ride, and 1 more lap, I didnít feel too bad but was wore out and tried to load up on the fluids to rehydrate. (I researched and it could have been heat exhaustion correct?)
During the week I felt rundown and week on my workouts. Consequently I cut my 4 workouts down to 3 of half and hour for one and 2 1 hour for the others at a zone 1-2. Sleep was restless and woke up groggy and lacking energy (for the whole days.)
I went to broken oak did a preride and couldnít keep an easy pace so I decided to not race and rest a few days, completely off the bike. Slept all day Monday.
Since Tuesday Iíve done low intensity workouts 3x 1 hour zone 1-2. Although I feel better than last week I just donít feel a 100%.
Iím trying to make the decision on whether to ride the race tomorrow. Opinion?
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The Bike Doc
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Joined: 08 May 2003
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Location: Corpus Christi and Warda, Texas

PostPosted: Fri Jun 04, 2004 10:13 am GMT +0000    Post subject: Re: Heat exhaustion, lasting effects, continue performance? Reply with quote

The Toninator NLI wrote:
Opinion?


Clinton inhaled!
Bush snorted!
Hillary remembered!
Regan knew!

Opinions, I got lots of 'em....

Now about your dehydration...

It can take several weeks for the body to recover from dehydration. Though the intravascular volume (the fluid within the blood vessels) can be rapidly replaced during the first 24 hours, it takes several weeks for the depleted volume in the extravascular space within the cells and the area around the cells to be re-established. That translates into decreased performance and increased suceptibility to heat stress injury.

Should you ride the 12 Hours of Dirt? With your recent dehydration and your persisting dimished performance, your body probably has not recovered from the heat exhaustion you incurred. Lay low for the next few weeks. Come out to the 12 hrs of Dirt to support your friends.

Thanks,
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Paul K. Nolan, MD
AKA: The Bike Doc
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the toninator
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Joined: 01 May 2003
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Location: Hights

PostPosted: Fri Jun 04, 2004 10:18 am GMT +0000    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks doc.

how do you feel about soy futures?
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Anonymous
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 04, 2004 10:20 am GMT +0000    Post subject: Reply with quote

the toninator wrote:
thanks doc.

how do you feel about soy futures?


You didn't ask me, but I think they perpetuate camping issues.

Good question. I have been wondering some of the same things you asked about too.
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racer99
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Joined: 25 Oct 2003
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 04, 2004 8:07 pm GMT +0000    Post subject: Reply with quote

T, once again you put together an excuse with an alibi.
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Anonymous
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2004 7:36 am GMT +0000    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are heat exhaustion and stroke directly related to dehydration?
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Anonymous
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2004 7:53 am GMT +0000    Post subject: Reply with quote

Heat Stroke is often the (terrible) end result of Heat Cramps that went to Heat Exhaustion that goes to Heat Stroke...

Yuck
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Anonymous
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2004 9:47 am GMT +0000    Post subject: Reply with quote

So are they caused by dehydration or salt depletion or both?
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The Bike Doc
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Joined: 08 May 2003
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Location: Corpus Christi and Warda, Texas

PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2004 9:52 am GMT +0000    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is both salt as well as fluid loss in heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Sometimes when just water is taken in but nothing with electrolytes or salt, serious complications of hyponatremia (low sodium) and hypokalemia (low potassium) can occur even though the fluid volume is addequate. These complications can be severe muscle weakness, abdominal cramps, vomiting, mental confussion, seizures and/or death from severe brain swelling.

Thanks,
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Paul K. Nolan, MD
AKA: The Bike Doc
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2004 10:35 pm GMT +0000    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe someone else asked this question before...if they did I have not read it. Here it is, I heard from several sources that once you suffer heat stroke it becomes easier to suffer heat stroke again. How does the body change that this happens?
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The Bike Doc
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Joined: 08 May 2003
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Location: Corpus Christi and Warda, Texas

PostPosted: Sat Jun 12, 2004 11:07 am GMT +0000    Post subject: Reply with quote

A person is more susceptible to heat injury for several weeks after heat stroke or heat exhaustion due to the severe dehydration that occurs not only to the fluid volume in the blood vessels but also in fluid in the tissue within the cells and the spaces around the cells. Though the intravascular blood volume can be rapidly replaced, it takes much longer to replenish the extravascular fluid space.

Additionally, some individuals are more prone to heat stress injury due to the physiologic make up. Some individuals are more efficient at sweating and can cool their bodies more effectively (provided ample and appropriate fluid intake is consumed) and others are less efficient at cooling thier bodies. Those less effecient cooling individuals will always be more prone to heat stress injury. With training and conditioning, the sweat output of the body can be increased, which helps improve the efficiency of cooling. With the higher sweat output that comes with training, the fluid intake and electrolyte intake must also be increased to maintain sweating/cooling effeciency. However, even the most effective body at cooling itself can be overcome by excess heat and humidity.

Thanks,
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Paul K. Nolan, MD
AKA: The Bike Doc
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